2013 Attitudes and Beliefs about the Social Determinants of Health Report

This report highlights the attitudes and beliefs about the Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) of Halton adults aged 18 and over using self-reported data collected from the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System (RRFSS) in 2013. The SDoH influence the environments where we live, learn, work, play and age. These environments are important because they shape our opportunities to be healthy, and strongly influence the health outcomes of Canadians. Addressing the SDoH can be a challenge as the public’s perception of factors related to our health tend to not include things related to socioeconomic status such as income, education, and employment. This report provides us with information that can be used to better frame and target communication messages about the SDoH.

Key Findings

Sex

  • Females were more likely to recognize that government policies/programs, having helpful family friends & neighbours, early childhood experiences, having access to safe and affordable housing, a person’s ability to cope with challenges and difficulties, and having access to quality and timely healthcare were very or extremely important factors in helping make a person healthy.

Age

  • Older adults, aged 65 and over, were more likely to recognize that how much money and education a person has, their job or employment situation and government policies/programs were very or extremely important factors in helping make a person healthy.

Income

  • Lower income adults were more likely to recognize that how much money a person has was a very or extremely important factor in helping make a person healthy.
  • While higher income adults were more likely to view lifestyle choices as a very or extremely important factor in helping make a person healthy.

Education

  • Adults who were not post-secondary graduates were more likely to recognize that government policies/programs were very or extremely important factors in helping make a person healthy.