Candidates Response to Question 2 of the 2015 Federal Election Questionnaire

On October 19, 2015 Halton voters will cast their ballot for local Federal candidates. On behalf of Halton residents, Regional Chair Gary Carr has sent a letter and questionnaire to Halton’s candidates asking for their positions on a number of issues of critical importance to Halton Region.

Question 2

Weather patterns have changed over the past few decades negatively impacting many communities including Halton Region which have seen an increase in severe weather events such as extended heat waves, torrential rain and ice storms. Without provincial and federal best practices and investment, municipalities are required to manage the social, economic, infrastructure, environmental and health-related consequences of climate change in the community, often at a very high cost. Long-term, sustainable funding is required for municipalities to improve community resilience and to reduce the severity of future climate change effects.

What would you and your government do to help municipalities adapt and respond to climate change?

Choose which candidates to display
Burlington
    Vince Fiorito – Green Party of Canada



Oakville North-Burlington






Milton
    Alex Anabusi – New Democratic Party
    Mini Batra – Green Party of Canada


    Azim Rizvee – Liberal Party of Canada

Oakville

    Che Marville – New Democratic Party


Wellington - Halton Hills



    Anne Gajerski-Cauley – New Democratic Party


Karina Gould – Liberal Party of Canada 
Climate change is real, and we’re starting to experience its effects here in Burlington. The flooding that occurred last summer, impacting over 4,000 homes, is just one example of increasing extreme weather events in our community and across the country. We need a federal government that is prepared to act. Today, the Conservatives have an international reputation as a pariah on the climate file. Locally, our MP has demonstrated no serious commitment or leadership on climate change. He has had nearly a decade to take action on climate change, and has failed to do so.
The Liberal Party of Canada is thus committed to restoring Canada’s reputation as a leader in environmental management. The provinces and territories recognize the need to act now, and have already begun to price carbon and take action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We will end the cycle of federal parties – of all stripes – setting arbitrary targets without a real federal-provincial/territorial plan in place.
We will instead partner with provincial and territorial leaders to develop real climate change solutions, consistent with our international obligations to protect the planet, all while growing our economy.
As Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau will attend the December 2015 UN Climate Change Conference in Paris and within 90 days hold a First Ministers meeting to collaborate on a framework to combat climate change, informed by the best economic and scientific analysis.
A liberal government is committed to holistic environmental management. This includes: CLEAN JOBS: We will invest in clean technology producers, to support innovation in the use of clean technologies in our natural resource sectors, including the forestry, fisheries, mining, energy, and agricultural sectors.
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS: We will restore confidence in government led environmental assessments. Ensuring that there is robust oversight and that decisions are based on science, facts, and evidence, and serve the public’s interest.
WATER: We will treat our freshwater as a precious resource that deserves protection and careful stewardship. We will work with other orders of government to protect Canada’s freshwater using education, geo-mapping, watershed protection, and investments in the best wastewater treatment technologies. I will be a strong advocate for the Canadian Centre for Inland Waters, a premiere fresh-water research institute located in Burlington.
OCEANS: We will reinstate the $40 million that Stephen Harper cut from the federal government’s ocean science and monitoring programs. We will restore that funding so that we can protect the health of our fish stocks, monitor contaminants and pollution in our oceans, and support responsible and sustainable aquaculture industries on our coasts.
NATIONAL PARKS: To protect ecosystems and species at risk, we will invest $25 million each year to develop Canada’s National Parks system, as well as manage and expand National Wildlife Areas and Migratory Bird Sanctuaries.
We will also work with the Ontario government to create the country’s first urban National Park – Rouge National Park – including improved legislation to protect this important ecosystem and guide how the park will be managed.
A liberal government will be seriously committed to addressing climate change. If we do not act now, we will continue to put our natural habitat, our species, and our own economic future at risk. The Liberal party is offering a sensible, credible approach to the environment and the economy. We will undo the damage done by Harper and and give to our children and grandchildren a country that is even more beautiful, sustainable and prosperous than what we have now.
View all of Karina Gould's responses

David Laird

David Laird – New Democratic Party 
Our Climate change record is the worst of the world’s wealthiest 27 countries. Weather events are not only becoming more severe, but are increasing in frequency. The Federal government must work with local and regional government to improve the resilience of Burlington to these events. We must work with provinces to reduce the impact climate change is having on all of our communities. The NDP understands that a multidimensional approach that includes regional partners, strong action on the economy, and leadership at the Federal level is needed to tackle this alarming problem.

The NDP will tackle climate change by transitioning to a green economy. We will kick start our clean energy sector and make investments to insure that we become a global market leader in clean energy.

We will reduce Canada’s fossil fuel dependency and support energy efficiency and conservation. The NDP will implement a cap and trade system that puts a price on carbon and we will begin to meet our international obligations by seriously rejoining the international discussion on climate change with clear targets to reduce our carbon emissions.
View all of David Lairds's responses

Mike Wallace

Mike Wallace – Conservative Party of Canada
The Conservative government is the first government in Canadian history to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). During the previous Liberal government, GHGs rose in an uncontrolled fashion from 600 Mt in 1993 to 749 Mt in 2006. Since coming to office in 2006, the Conservative government has reduced GHGs to 726 in 2013, the most recent year reported. Conservatives will continue to reduce GHGs, through the continued rollout of a sector-by-sector regulatory approach.
Conservatives are committed to continuing to work with the Halton Region to ensure that federal funds continue to be available for municipal infrastructure. The risks presented by a warming climate require that municipal infrastructure be hardened against the increased risk of floods, ice storms and other severe weather events.
Over the last 10 years, the Conservative government has partnered with local municipalities in Halton Region and invested in hundreds of local infrastructure projects. Since 2006, an unprecedented $33 billion in federal funds has been spent on over 12,000 municipal and provincial infrastructure projects across Canada.
Nevertheless, more needs to be done. That is why, last year, the federal budget announced a record new investment of $70 billion for public infrastructure over the next decade, which includes $53 billion for municipal and provincial infrastructure projects. This funding will ensure that money is available to harden local infrastructure against the increase in extreme weather events caused by climate change.
View all of Mike Wallace's responses

Chris Jewell – Libertarian Party of Canada 
The absolute best way to solve the potential problem of carbon emissions is by boosting our economy. We cannot create a vibrant economy with a tax on all production, construction, human activity and life itself. What I am referring to of course is a carbon tax.
By fixing our economy, research and development will continue to advance. New, cleaner, more innovative solutions will present themselves. The free market and voting with our dollars will solve the problem faster than a tax will. If everyone could afford to drive a Tesla I'm sure they would. I know I would love to be able to do away with our petroleum economy, but only after a viable solution is presented.
If we had better infrastructure, like highways that weren't grid locked, we could greatly reduce the amount of time cars are stuck on the road, thus reducing carbon emissions. If we actually let corporations fail, like GM or oil companies, instead of bailing them out and giving them corporate welfare, we would see newer, more innovative companies able to enter the market! If we make sure the economy is growing and make sure Canadians have the cash in their pockets they need to actually buy newer and cleaner products, like Tesla cars. Make sure this we have an environment where new businesses can enter the market and provide product we actually want to buy! That's how we fix the issue. However, all of these solutions, which would actually solve the problem and increase our quality of life, will only be possible if we fix our economy.
By the way, let's just address the fact right now that alternatives to the internal combustion engine are out there and are being suppressed. Does anyone really believe that in 60 years we can go from horses and buggies to landing on the moon but in 100 years we haven't invented anything better than the internal combustion engine? Let the big guys fail who have been actively suppressing alternatives and let the technology patents come back on the market! Let up start companies buy up the patents and watch our entire society change over night!
I would like everyone reading this to notice I said potential problem. You see, I was once a true believer, to the point I would lecture people about idling their cars. At some point though, I really started to question what we were being told about climate change. After all, since the 1970s we have been inundated with apocalyptic predictions, like, 'there will be a new ice age, or the Mediterranean will be uninhabitable due to heat, or Florida will be underwater, or the poles will be completely ice free by the early 2000s!' There were many dates given for these predictions that have come and gone, and nothing has come true. There are also the scandals, like the University of East Anglia manipulating the raw data to hide the decline. Of course, there is also the financial benefit and hypocrisy those who push the climate change message which I won't bother discussing but can be easily verified. Lastly, there is also the simple fact that the Sun is the main driver of our climate. Changing weather patterns can be easily linked to periods of solar dormancy and activity. I am not denying that climate change exists, but due to the facts I have stated above, I cannot support taxing Canadians for carbon emissions. We simply cannot, in good conscience, levy an economy destroying tax--which will greatly decrease our quality of life--when we simply cannot make an accurate prediction; when we are not even 100% sure what's going on.
Climate change has also eclipsed real environmental crisis which we are facing. Crisis like the massive deforestation of the Amazon jungle, Fukushima poisoning the pacific ocean and plastic and pharmaceutical contamination of just about every source of water on the planet. Even if you believe carbon dioxide is a pollutant, these issues are much more pressing to the survival of the species. After all, carbon dioxide is the byproduct of all animal life on this planet. In periods of higher carbon dioxide, plants thrived and the deserts were significantly smaller!
Perhaps you are reading this and saying to yourself, 'but our cities are flooding from the rain! That never happened before!' The answer to this goes back to the infrastructure problem we are facing in Ontario. The sewer system in Toronto, for example, is archaic in many areas. On King st. West, close to Liberty village, the sewers are 100 year old red brick, combination sewers! They are simply not equipped to handle the volume of development in the area. The same can be said for most other municipalities. The infrastructure is severely outdated and just not equipped to handle the modern burden placed upon it. Climate change offers a convenient excuse to many municipalities. Why blame city hall when you can blame climate change.
To summarize, I am highly sceptical of the science of climate change. I would also like to remind everyone reading this, that human beings are Co2 producing machines. Co2 is a byproduct of cellular respiration. A tax on Co2 will is a tax on breathing itself. Taken to its logical conclusion, you will be taxed on every child you bring into the world, since you are technically increasing your families carbon foot print. A carbon tax is destructive. Economists say, "the power to tax is the power to destroy." My question to you is, when all human activity-- when life itself--produces carbon, what are we trying to destroy?
View all of Chris Jewell's responses

Lisa Raitt

Lisa Raitt – Conservative Party of Canada
The Conservative government is the first government in Canadian history to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). During the previous Liberal government, GHGs rose in an uncontrolled fashion from 600 Mt in 1993 to 749 Mt in 2006. Since coming to office in 2006, the Conservative government has reduced GHGs to 726 in 2013, the most recent year reported. Conservatives will continue to reduce GHGs, through the continued rollout of a sector-by-sector regulatory approach.
Conservatives are committed to continuing to work with the Halton Region to ensure that federal funds continue to be available for municipal infrastructure. The risks presented by a warming climate require that municipal infrastructure be hardened against the increased risk of floods, ice storms and other severe weather events.
Over the last 10 years, the Conservative government has partnered with local municipalities in Halton Region and invested in hundreds of local infrastructure projects. Since 2006, an unprecedented $33 billion in federal funds has been spent on over 12,000 municipal and provincial infrastructure projects across Canada.
Nevertheless, more needs to be done. That is why, last year, the federal budget announced a record new investment of $70 billion for public infrastructure over the next decade, which includes $53 billion for municipal and provincial infrastructure projects. This funding will ensure that money is available to harden local infrastructure against the increase in extreme weather events caused by climate change.
View all of Lisa Raitt 's responses

David Doel

David Doel – Green Party of Canada  website   mail
Not surprisingly, this is one of the issues that is most closely associated with the Green Party of Canada, and that's something we can be proud of as more years of inaction or lip-service are not going to guarantee future generations of Canadians the future we want for them.
Our platform outlines bold action on climate change. This is a long-term vision that would, in effect, mean weaning Canada off of fossil fuel use by mid-century, with an urgent target of 40% below our 2005 levels by 2025.
Also, it's worth noting that the Green Party understands that, as far as some climate change effects are concerned, the die has already been cast. We are committed to keeping our communities safe by mandating world-class disaster preparedness so Canadians can feel more secure as extreme weather events and other regrettable consequences of climate change become more frequent.
View all of David Doel's responses

John Oliver – Liberal Party of Canada  website   mail
Essentially, your question relates to two issues: taking action to address climate change; and being prepared to withstand the effects of climate change.
Climate change is an immediate and significant threat to our communities and our economy. The provinces and territories recognize the need to act now, but there has been a dearth of federal leadership on climate change over the last decade. We will end the cycle of federal parties – of all stripes – setting arbitrary targets without a real federal/provincial/territorial plan in place.
With respect to addressing climate change, the Liberal Party will provide national leadership and join with the provinces and territories to take action on climate change, put a price on carbon, and reduce carbon pollution. We will partner with provincial and territorial leaders to develop real climate change solutions, consistent with our international obligations to protect the planet, all while growing our economy. Together, we will attend the Paris climate conference, and within 90 days formally meet to establish a pan-Canadian framework for combating climate change.
We will work together to establish national emissions-reduction targets, and ensure that the provinces and territories have targeted federal funding and the flexibility to design their own policies to meet these commitments, including their own carbon pricing policies.
These targets must recognise the economic cost and catastrophic impact that a greater-than-two-degree increase in average global temperatures would represent, as well as the need for Canada to do its part to prevent that from happening.
Partnering with the provinces and territories, we will create a new Low Carbon Economy Trust. The Trust will provide funding to projects that materially reduce carbon emissions under the new pan-Canadian framework. We will endow the Low Carbon Economy Trust with $2 billion in our mandate.
With respect to preparing to withstand the effects of climate change, the Liberal Party will invest in sustainable infrastructure that makes our communities safer and more resilient.
Responsible governments do not walk away from challenges, or pretend they do not exist. We will protect our communities from the challenges of climate change and grow our economy by making significant new investments in green infrastructure.
This includes investments in local water and wastewater facilities; clean energy; climate resilient infrastructure, including flood mitigation systems; and infrastructure to protect against changing weather.
View all of John Oliver's responses

Terence Young

Terence Young – Conservative Party of Canada
The Conservative government is the first government in Canadian history to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). During the previous Liberal government, GHGs rose in an uncontrolled fashion from 600 Mt in 1993 to 749 Mt in 2006. Since coming to office in 2006, the Conservative government has reduced GHGs to 726 in 2013, the most recent year reported. Conservatives will continue to reduce GHGs, through the continued rollout of a sector-by-sector regulatory approach.
Conservatives are committed to continuing to work with the Halton Region to ensure that federal funds continue to be available for municipal infrastructure. The risks presented by a warming climate require that municipal infrastructure be hardened against the increased risk of floods, ice storms and other severe weather events.
Over the last 10 years, the Conservative government has partnered with local municipalities in Halton Region and invested in hundreds of local infrastructure projects. Since 2006, an unprecedented $33 billion in federal funds has been spent on over 12,000 municipal and provincial infrastructure projects across Canada.
Nevertheless, more needs to be done. That is why, last year, the federal budget announced a record new investment of $70 billion for public infrastructure over the next decade, which includes $53 billion for municipal and provincial infrastructure projects. This funding will ensure that money is available to harden local infrastructure against the increase in extreme weather events caused by climate change.
View all of Terence Young's responses

Janice Best

Janice Best – New Democratic Party  website   mail
The NDP will invest in targeted sustainable development priorities over the next four years to tackle climate change and adapt our communities in partnership with provinces, municipalities and Indigenous governments. This funding will invest in provincial, territorial and municipal home energy programs to retrofit 50,000 homes and 15,000 apartment units to lower energy bills and create thousands of jobs ($200 million over 4 years). We will invest in the Green Municipal Fund through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to support sustainable development pilot projects, including energy efficiency, energy recovery, and transition to cleaner fuel for municipal transit ($150 million over 4 years). The NDP will also create targets for the electrification of federal vehicle fleets and strengthen Canada’s green procurement policy to reduce long-term fuel and maintenance costs, including the installation of 150 electric car charging stations on federal properties across Canada.
View all of Janice Best's responses

David Clement – Libertarian Party of Canada  website   mail
Climate change is certainly an issue, and one that the Libertarian Party takes seriously. Our environmental platform involves fundamentally changing the way we deal with environmental damage, by enacting what is called environmental torts. In short, we would use property rights as a means to protect against environmental degradation, where citizens could effectively use the judicial system against those who externalize their pollution/waste.
That being said, national strategies when it comes to funding local environmental initiatives are often poorly carried out and do not deliver the same results that locally run programs do. Municipal environmental strategies need to be funded and carried out at the local level. This is especially important given the varying concerns that communities have depending on where they are situated in Canada. A Libertarian government would empower local communities to create tailored response programs that meet their specific local needs.
View all of David Clement's responses

Pam Damoff – Liberal Party of Canada  website   mail
The environment and climate change are foremost priorities for me and a Liberal government. To ensure a safe, clean and predictable future for next generations, a Liberal government will provide dedicated funding to invest in a broad range of projects, including but not limited to: local water and wastewater facilities, climate resilient infrastructure, clean energy, and clean-up of contaminated sites to facilitate new construction.
A Liberal government will also support efforts to prepare for changing weather patterns, such as: improved storm water systems to diminish the impact of urban floods, the reinforcement of energy systems in the face of possible ice storms, and the reinforcement of infrastructure to confront melting permafrost in our North that will impact all communities in Canada. These and other efforts will be undertaken in partnership with other orders of government and based on the best available science. Under Justin Trudeau’s leadership, Canada will boost investment in green infrastructure by nearly $6 billion over the next four years, and almost $20 billion over ten years.
View all of Pam Damoff's responses

Adnan Shahbaz

Adnan Shahbaz – Green Party of Canada 
We need to combat climate change head-on by introducing programs that are targeted, realistic and proactive. Carbon pricing, Cap Fee and Dividend and polluter pays are just some of the market driven mechanisms that we can use to combat climate change. Also supporting and enhancing green energy, technology and incentivizing the transition to a post-carbon world are ways that we can be ahead of future disasters.
However, Canada is already experiencing more frequent extreme weather events, as a consequence of accelerating climate change arising from our dependence on fossil fuels. In the face of increasingly frequent disasters, Canada is unprepared to respond. Cutting federal funding for disaster assistance is not the way to meet this challenge. We need federal leadership and coordination to be able to effectively respond to future disasters. A Council of Canadian Governments will bring all levels of government together to develop a comprehensive National Strategy for Disaster Preparedness, to ensure that Canadian cities and towns are prepared to respond in the future. These life or death scenarios cannot be left to a patchwork response system.
Our federal government must ensure an emergency response system that is proactive, comprehensive and long term, one that efficiently and effectively coordinates key emergency management players at all levels of government with a wide range of stakeholders. The federal government must support collaborative and cost sharing approaches to ensure adequate funding and strengthen community capacity building and preparedness. Our federal government must return to the business of supporting comprehensive municipal, territorial, and provincial emergency preparedness plans. Such measures include providing public education and training programs; fast tracking the seismic upgrading of public buildings such as hospitals, schools, and fire halls; improving local emergency infrastructure, such as adequate tsunami warning systems, civil defense sirens and other communication systems; clear marking of emergency evacuation routes; and ensuring the means to supply essential services such as medical services, energy supplies, food and water.
We must also undertake budgetary planning for post disaster recovery. The federal government has a responsibility to provide stable and predictable funding, and lead a coordinated response to disaster assistance in Canada. In addition, all sectors need to be prepared for the impacts of a changing climate. We need, in conjunction with provinces, territories, municipalities, and Indigenous governments, to implement a comprehensive adaptation strategy to prepare our cities, agriculture, forestry, the fishery, our health care systems and all vulnerable aspects of our society to the impacts of climate change we can no longer avoid. The Green Party will invest in comprehensive response plans for flooding and other extreme weather events to bring Canadian disaster readiness up to world class standards, so we can more ably respond to the extreme weather events that are becoming more common as the climate changes
View all of Adnan Shahbaz's responses

Effie Triantafilopoulos

Effie Triantafilopoulos – Conservative Party of Canada
The Conservative government is the first government in Canadian history to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). During the previous Liberal government, GHGs rose in an uncontrolled fashion from 600 Mt in 1993 to 749 Mt in 2006. Since coming to office in 2006, the Conservative government has reduced GHGs to 726 in 2013, the most recent year reported. Conservatives will continue to reduce GHGs, through the continued rollout of a sector-by-sector regulatory approach.
Conservatives are committed to continuing to work with the Halton Region to ensure that federal funds continue to be available for municipal infrastructure. The risks presented by a warming climate require that municipal infrastructure be hardened against the increased risk of floods, ice storms and other severe weather events.
Over the last 10 years, the Conservative government has partnered with local municipalities in Halton Region and invested in hundreds of local infrastructure projects. Since 2006, an unprecedented $33 billion in federal funds has been spent on over 12,000 municipal and provincial infrastructure projects across Canada.
Nevertheless, more needs to be done. That is why, last year, the federal budget announced a record new investment of $70 billion for public infrastructure over the next decade, which includes $53 billion for municipal and provincial infrastructure projects. This funding will ensure that money is available to harden local infrastructure against the increase in extreme weather events caused by climate change.
View all of Effie Triantafilopoulos's responses

Harvey Edward Anstey

Harvey Edward Anstey, Wellington - Halton Hills - Canadian Action Party (CAP)  harvey.anstey@actionparty.ca
The federal government could be a leader in training staff to handle these issues. We must make sure that when we approve any projects they are done with climate change considerations. We must research this issue which could be funded by the savings generated using the Bank of Canada.
The federal government could set up regional disaster relief teams that would be able to assist when requested by local levels of government.
View all of Harvey Edward Anstey's responses

Brent Allan Bouteiller

Brent Allan Bouteiller – Green Party of Canada  website   mail
The Green Party of Canada would take Bold Action on Climate


    • Defend our coastal waters from risky pipelines and tanker schemes;
    • Implement a Canadian Climate and Energy Strategy, eliminating the more than $1 billion dollars a year in subsidies to the fossil fuel industry; and
    • Introduce a Carbon Fee and Dividend system to put a price on carbon and pay the funds it generates directly to Canadians.
    • Begin work the day after the election to develop with a more ambitious Canadian climate position with other levels of government that demonstrates leadership at the United Nations Climate Summit in Paris. Only the Green Party of Canada has been fully engaged in the process over the last four years.


View all of Brent Allan Bouteiller's responses
Michael Chong

Michael Chong – Conservative Party of Canada
The Conservative government is the first government in Canadian history to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). During the previous Liberal government, GHGs rose in an uncontrolled fashion from 600 Mt in 1993 to 749 Mt in 2006. Since coming to office in 2006, the Conservative government has reduced GHGs to 726 in 2013, the most recent year reported. Conservatives will continue to reduce GHGs, through the continued rollout of a sector-by-sector regulatory approach.
Conservatives are committed to continuing to work with the Halton Region to ensure that federal funds continue to be available for municipal infrastructure. The risks presented by a warming climate require that municipal infrastructure be hardened against the increased risk of floods, ice storms and other severe weather events.
Over the last 10 years, the Conservative government has partnered with local municipalities in Halton Region and invested in hundreds of local infrastructure projects. Since 2006, an unprecedented $33 billion in federal funds has been spent on over 12,000 municipal and provincial infrastructure projects across Canada.
Nevertheless, more needs to be done. That is why, last year, the federal budget announced a record new investment of $70 billion for public infrastructure over the next decade, which includes $53 billion for municipal and provincial infrastructure projects. This funding will ensure that money is available to harden local infrastructure against the increase in extreme weather events caused by climate change.
View all of Michael Chong's responses

Don Trant – Liberal Party of Canada 
Liberal Government Investment in Green Infrastructure and Sustainable Prosperity
Nation-building projects like the CPR, St. Lawrence Seaway and the Trans-Canada Highway, would not have been possible without leadership from the government of Canada. Today new challenges have emerged, central to which are climate change and threats to our water and land. Sadly, during the Harper/Chong decade Canada’s environment has suffered and our infrastructure deficit has increased.
The Liberal plan will undo the damage done by the Harper / Chong government and ensure that our infrastructure is able to adapt to the new challenges and contribute to our future growth and prosperity.
A Liberal government will:

  • Partner with the provinces and territories already working to develop a Canadian Energy Strategy. Primary objectives will include Canada’s energy security, energy conservation, and cleaner renewable electric energy.
  • Establish the Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB) to provide low-cost financing to build new infrastructure projects.
  • Through the CIB, issue Green Bonds to make green infrastructure projects such as retrofits of buildings, clean power storage, smart grid technology and renewable energy projects, more attractive to private investors.
  • Work with other orders of government to protect Canada’s freshwater through education, geo-mapping, watershed protection, and infrastructure investments in the best wastewater treatment technologies.
  • Focus investment in green projects including but not limited to:
    • Climate resilient infrastructure
      • Fund retrofitting, construction, replacement, expansion or purchase and installation of infrastructure that will improve environmental performance in municipal, energy, transportation, waste, or water and combinations there of
      • Based on best science and in partnership with other orders of government support preparation for changing weather patterns, such as: protections against wildfires, improved storm water systems, additional dams and dikes and reinforcement of energy systems in the face of possible ice storms.
      • Work with the provinces and territories to develop a coordinated action plan that allows us to better prepare for – and respond to – weather-related emergencies.
    • Local water and wastewater facilities
      • Support water conservation projects including grey water systems, rainwater collection, and fixture replacement programs.
      • Invest in storm water management projects: rainwater collection and reuse, green roofs, rain gardens for bio-retention, infiltration initiatives (such as storm water planters, infiltration tranches, and permeable pavement)
    • Clean energy technologies
      • Help territories and provinces invest in modern grid, power storage, and transmission to ensure a bigger role for clean energy.
      • Support new energy efficient buildings equipped with on-site renewable energy, such as a solar photovoltaic system, a solar thermal system for space and water heating and a wind or biogas system.
      • Invest $300 million per year in clean technology innovation and support of clean technology firms and clean technology exporters
    • Environmental assessment and protection
      • Restore robust oversight and thorough environmental assessment by replacing Harper’s changes to environmental oversight
      • Restore The Fisheries Act and Navigable Water Protection Act
      • Reverse the Harper / Chong government’s 2012 budget cuts to Parks Canada
      • Restore $1.5 million in federal funding for fresh water research and make new investments in Canada’s IISD Experimental Lakes Area
    • Action on climate change
      • Meet with provinces and territories to build an emissions reduction agreement with federal targets and incentives
      • Fulfil the G20 commitment to phase out subsidies to the fossil fuel industry

View all of Don Trant's responses