Candidates Response to Question 5 of the 2015 Federal Election Questionnaire

On October 19, 2015 Halton voters will cast their ballot for local Federal candidates. On behalf of Halton residents, Regional Chair Gary Carr has sent a letter and questionnaire to Halton’s candidates asking for their positions on a number of issues of critical importance to Halton Region.

Question 5

Currently, Halton region has a population of more than 500,000 and it is expected to meet mandated growth targets of 780,000 by the year 2031. The Town of Milton continues to be the fastest growing community in Canada and the Greater Toronto Area with a population that increased by 56.6 per cent between 2006 and 2011. The amount of children aged zero to four in Halton has also continued to increase each year, creating a significant need for childcare and early learning programs. For many households, childcare continues to be the second-largest expense after housing. In addition to high fees, there are simply not enough spaces to meet the demand for childcare in the Halton community. As a result, many Halton families continue to struggle to find affordable, quality childcare options for their young children.

How would you and your government ensure that there are more affordable and accessible early learning and childcare spaces available to match Halton’s growing population?

Choose which candidates to display
Burlington
    Vince Fiorito – Green Party of Canada



Oakville North-Burlington






Milton
    Alex Anabusi – New Democratic Party
    Mini Batra – Green Party of Canada


    Azim Rizvee – Liberal Party of Canada

Oakville

    Che Marville – New Democratic Party


Wellington - Halton Hills



    Anne Gajerski-Cauley – New Democratic Party


Karina Gould – Liberal Party of Canada 
Childcare is one of the most important issues among Canadians – and has become an extremely costly burden. Working parents, amid all their pressures, struggle to find adequate child care support and many parents are forced to leave the workforce or make compromises on the level of care their kids are receiving. In fact, one of the first town halls I held in February 2015, was on the topic of childcare for Burlington families.
A Liberal government recognizes that the future of the Canadian economy and the health of our society depend on our children having the strongest possible start in life. Affordable, high-quality childcare – affordable, accessible, flexible, and inclusive – is essential for the success of middle-class families and the Canadian economy as a whole.
Within the first 100 days of being elected, a Liberal government will initiate ministerial meetings with provinces, territories, and Indigenous Peoples to create a new National Early Learning and Child Care Framework.
We will cancel tax breaks and benefits for the wealthy – including the Universal Child Care Benefit – and introduce a new Canada Child Benefit to give Canadian families more money to raise their kids.
Under our plan, nine out of ten Canadian families will receive more than under Stephen Harper’s confusing collection of child benefit programs. For the typical family of four, that means an additional $2,500 in help, tax-free, every year.
Because our Canada Child Benefit is tax-free and tied to income, it also provides greater support to those who need help the most: single-parent families and low-income families. Our plan will lift 315,000 Canadian children out of poverty.
View all of Karina Gould's responses

David Laird

David Laird – New Democratic Party 
With the average cost of childcare rising to more than $1,200 a month per child, childcare is becoming prohibitively expensive for families. This rising cost is creating work-life conflicts for working parents that are costing the Canadian business community $4 billion per year. This heavy cost is being carried predominantly by working women who sacrifice career goals because they cannot find affordable childcare.

The NDP has committed to working with the provinces to deliver a Canada-wide early childhood education and childcare program. We will create and sustain 1 million childcare spaces throughout Canada at a cost of no more than $15 a day. Since Quebec introduced its affordable childcare program more than 70,000 women have re-entered the workforce. This not only helps strengthen and grow our economy but is a serious step toward addressing gender inequality. I believe that the NDP’s childcare program is not only transformative, but emancipatory for working women.
View all of David Lairds's responses

Mike Wallace

Mike Wallace – Conservative Party of Canada
Conservatives introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), increased the Child Care Expense Deduction and introduced income splitting for families with children.
This year the UCCB was increased to $1,920 per year per child under the age of six, and a new benefit of $720 per year per child aged six through seventeen was introduced. In addition, the Child Care Expense Deduction was increased by $1,000 per child for the 2015 taxation year. This will allow parents, where both parents work, to claim a bigger deduction for childcare expenses when they file their taxes in April 2016. Finally, the Family Tax Cut was introduced for couples with children under 18, allowing income-splitting to reduce federal taxes payable. A typical two-earner family of four will receive tax relief and increased benefits of up to $6,600 in 2015.
All these measures have helped millions of Canadian families by supporting their childcare choices through direct financial support.
View all of Mike Wallace's responses

Chris Jewell – Libertarian Party of Canada 
Firstly, child care is so expensive because of government licensing and intervention, so more government will not help. Secondly, it's so expensive because our wages have simply not kept pace with inflation.
If we fix the economy, more parents will be able to afford to stay home if they wish, or have more money in their pocket to pay for child care and the problem goes away. If we continue without making the reforms I have outlined in previous answers, child care will continue to be unaffordable.
Do you ever notice that when things are run by government the need increases year after year, the government never seems to be able to keep up? Have you ever noticed that the private sector never seems to struggle with keeping up with demand? Every single question asked so far relates to the same issue, of government apparently not being able to solve a problem, or requiring ever further investment in one area or another. Private companies can always keep us supplied with what we need, however governments always struggle to keep up with demand. Maybe, it’s time to look at private sector solutions for problems the government always struggles with.
Simple answer, let Canadians actually keep their money and fix the economy and they will be able to deal with child care on their own.
View all of Chris Jewell's responses

Lisa Raitt

Lisa Raitt – Conservative Party of Canada
Conservatives introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), increased the Child Care Expense Deduction and introduced income splitting for families with children.
This year the UCCB was increased to $1,920 per year per child under the age of six, and a new benefit of $720 per year per child aged six through seventeen was introduced. In addition, the Child Care Expense Deduction was increased by $1,000 per child for the 2015 taxation year. This will allow parents, where both parents work, to claim a bigger deduction for childcare expenses when they file their taxes in April 2016. Finally, the Family Tax Cut was introduced for couples with children under 18, allowing income-splitting to reduce federal taxes payable. A typical two-earner family of four will receive tax relief and increased benefits of up to $6,600 in 2015.
All these measures have helped millions of Canadian families by supporting their childcare choices through direct financial support.
View all of Lisa Raitt 's responses

David Doel

David Doel – Green Party of Canada  website   mail
The Green Party would seek to engage and incentivize the private sector to become a more active partner in the provision of childcare. We believe that workplace childcare has many advantages – enhanced parenting time and access to children through the work day, extension of breast-feeding opportunities, improved employee productivity, and improving the convenience of public transport when parents and kids share their morning destination. Tax breaks to employers for the creation of child care spaces is one tool among many we will use to ensure that families have the spaces they need.
So many nations around the world have realized for years that a healthy work-life balance, with the willing and active participation of employers and employees, is a strong spur to productivity and less of a drain on the public health sector in the long-term.
View all of David Doel's responses

John Oliver – Liberal Party of Canada  website   mail
Within the first 100 days of being elected, a Liberal government will initiate ministerial meetings with provinces, territories, and Indigenous Peoples to create a new National Early Learning and Child Care Framework.
This plan will be administered as part of our new social infrastructure investment of nearly $20 billion over the next ten years, and achieved in collaboration with—and in respect of—provincial jurisdiction.
We will not impose pre-determined costs or models on other orders of government, but instead we will work collaboratively with each of them on funding agreements using research, evidence-based policy, and best practices in the delivery of early learning and child care.
Our framework will build on the progress that provinces and territories have made in the absence of federal leadership and allow them to move further in providing more affordable, accessible, inclusive, high-quality child care and early learning, which considers the diverse needs of all children in Canada.
In addition to this child care strategy, our new Canada Child Benefit will help families will the high costs of raising their children. With the Canada Child Benefit, nine out of ten Canadian families will receive more than under the current government's confusing collection of child benefit programs. For the typical family of four, that means an additional $2,500 in help, tax-free, every year. This benefit could be used to defray the costs of child care.
Because the Canada Child Benefit is tax-free and tied to income, it also provides greater support to those who need help the most: single-parent families and low-income families. Our plan will lift 315,000 Canadian children out of poverty.
View all of John Oliver's responses

Terence Young

Terence Young – Conservative Party of Canada
Conservatives introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), increased the Child Care Expense Deduction and introduced income splitting for families with children.
This year the UCCB was increased to $1,920 per year per child under the age of six, and a new benefit of $720 per year per child aged six through seventeen was introduced. In addition, the Child Care Expense Deduction was increased by $1,000 per child for the 2015 taxation year. This will allow parents, where both parents work, to claim a bigger deduction for childcare expenses when they file their taxes in April 2016. Finally, the Family Tax Cut was introduced for couples with children under 18, allowing income-splitting to reduce federal taxes payable. A typical two-earner family of four will receive tax relief and increased benefits of up to $6,600 in 2015.
All these measures have helped millions of Canadian families by supporting their childcare choices through direct financial support.
View all of Terence Young's responses

Janice Best

Janice Best – New Democratic Party  website   mail
Too many parents, mothers in particular, are sacrificing career goals because they cannot find affordable care. Tom Mulcair and the NDP are committed to delivering a Canada-wide early childhood education and childcare program. We will create or maintain a million quality childcare spaces in Canada – where parents pay no more than $15 a day – including 60,000 spaces in the first year. Studies show that for every dollar invested in childcare, our economy grows by $2. A national childcare program could generate more than $3 billion for the federal government through additional revenues and reduced costs. By helping more women return to the workforce, we will generate billions of new dollars for our economy.
View all of Janice Best's responses

David Clement – Libertarian Party of Canada  website   mail
Much like affordable housing, the key to affordable childcare is ensuring that residents have more money in their pocket. As already mentioned, the Libertarian Party would seek to increase the Basic Exemption to $17,300 from $11,100. This significantly increases every Canadian’s tax free earnings. On top of that, individuals with children would receive an additional $4,000 tax exemption per child. This means that a single parent, with 2 children, would have their first $25,300 in income be tax free at the federal level. As already mentioned above, the average family in Oakville would save approximately $5,500 per year with our tax plan. Along with our additional exemption to accommodate for the cost of childcare and raising children, we have also included a disability exemption of $4,000. This additional exemption ensures that parents have the funds needed to meet the specific needs of their children in an accessible manner.
View all of David Clement's responses

Pam Damoff – Liberal Party of Canada  website   mail
The Liberal Party of Canada is committed to making childcare more affordable for middle class families and will do so by providing families with a Canada Child Benefit (CCB). Families, with children, that have annual incomes below $150,000 (9 out of 10 families) will receive more in monthly child benefit payments than under the current system. The benefit amount will be geared to income so that families who need it more, will get more. A typical two-parent family, with two kids, earning $90,000 per year will get $490 tax-free every month.
Further, all Canadians with taxable income over $44,700 will see their income tax rate fall; income earned between $44,700 and $89,401 will be subject to a reduced tax rate from 22 percent to 20.5 percent – a 7 percent reduction. This tax relief is worth up to $670 per year, per person – or $1,340 per year for a two-income household.
These initiatives will help middle class Canadian families afford the child care they need.
View all of Pam Damoff's responses

Adnan Shahbaz

Adnan Shahbaz – Green Party of Canada 
We will work with the provinces, territories and Indigenous communities to establish accessible, convenient, enriched and affordable child care spaces for any Canadian family that seeks it. We will support women to reenter the workforce whenever they choose after having children. The Green Party believes that workplace childcare has many advantages – enhanced parenting time and access to children through the work day, extension of breastfeeding opportunities, improved employee productivity, and improving the convenience of public transport when parents and kids share their morning destination. Tax breaks to employers for the creation of child care spaces is one tool among many we will use to ensure that families have the spaces they need.
Several provinces have gone it alone in designing innovative programs that work for their populations. Quebec has $7aday daycare (now on a sliding scale up to $20 a day depending on income). Ontario is moving towards full day kindergarten for 4 and 5 year olds. We will ramp up to $1 billion a year to support existing and new programs that would be cost shared with the provinces.
In addition, we support phasing out the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) and allocating the funds to federal support for a substantial increase in the number of regulated affordable child care spaces (the net cost of the UCCB will be approximately $6.7 billion by 20172018). Among other things, the Green Party goal is to negotiate with the provinces and territories to ensure that Canada collectively provides regulated child care spaces for 70 % of children age 6 or younger with working parents, instead of the mere 22.5% provided now.
View all of Adnan Shahbaz's responses

Effie Triantafilopoulos

Effie Triantafilopoulos – Conservative Party of Canada
Conservatives introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), increased the Child Care Expense Deduction and introduced income splitting for families with children.
This year the UCCB was increased to $1,920 per year per child under the age of six, and a new benefit of $720 per year per child aged six through seventeen was introduced. In addition, the Child Care Expense Deduction was increased by $1,000 per child for the 2015 taxation year. This will allow parents, where both parents work, to claim a bigger deduction for childcare expenses when they file their taxes in April 2016. Finally, the Family Tax Cut was introduced for couples with children under 18, allowing income-splitting to reduce federal taxes payable. A typical two-earner family of four will receive tax relief and increased benefits of up to $6,600 in 2015.
All these measures have helped millions of Canadian families by supporting their childcare choices through direct financial support.
View all of Effie Triantafilopoulos's responses

Harvey Edward Anstey

Harvey Edward Anstey, Wellington - Halton Hills - Canadian Action Party (CAP)  harvey.anstey@actionparty.ca
This is a major problem right across the country. This is not a one size fits all issue. We would find the funds and in consulting with the regions come up with a plan to eliminate this problem. We could make tax breaks available for starting regulated home daycares, work with community groups as a few options.
View all of Harvey Edward Anstey's responses

Brent Allan Bouteiller

Brent Allan Bouteiller – Green Party of Canada  website   mail
The Green Party will phase-in a national Guaranteed Livable Income, to ensure that no person’s income falls below what is necessary for health, life and dignity. One important step is ensuring high-quality affordable child care. We will work with the provinces, territories and Indigenous communities to establish accessible, convenient, enriched and affordable child care spaces for any Canadian family that seeks it. We will support women to re-enter the workforce whenever they choose after having children.
The Green Party believes that workplace childcare has many advantages – enhanced parenting time and access to children through the work day, extension of breast-feeding opportunities, improved employee productivity, and improving the convenience of public transport when parents and kids share their morning destination. Tax breaks to employers for the creation of child care spaces is one tool among many we will use to ensure that families have the spaces they need.
View all of Brent Allan Bouteiller's responses

Michael Chong

Michael Chong – Conservative Party of Canada
Conservatives introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), increased the Child Care Expense Deduction and introduced income splitting for families with children.
This year the UCCB was increased to $1,920 per year per child under the age of six, and a new benefit of $720 per year per child aged six through seventeen was introduced. In addition, the Child Care Expense Deduction was increased by $1,000 per child for the 2015 taxation year. This will allow parents, where both parents work, to claim a bigger deduction for childcare expenses when they file their taxes in April 2016. Finally, the Family Tax Cut was introduced for couples with children under 18, allowing income-splitting to reduce federal taxes payable. A typical two-earner family of four will receive tax relief and increased benefits of up to $6,600 in 2015.
All these measures have helped millions of Canadian families by supporting their childcare choices through direct financial support.
View all of Michael Chong's responses

Don Trant – Liberal Party of Canada 
A Liberal government will provide Canadians with the help they need now to strengthen their families and communities.
After a decade in office, it is clear that the Harper / Chong government is out of touch and will not help Canadian families. The NDP talks about Canada’s urgent need for child care, yet their promise is back-loaded, will be delayed for years, and is significantly underfunded.
A Liberal government will provide support for Canadian families that addressed their multi-faceted needs by putting more money in the pockets of the families who need it most; providing high-quality, affordable, accessible, inclusive child care spaces; and offering greater flexibility for working parents and economic security for women.
A Liberal government will:

  • Introduce the Canada Child Benefit, which provides more help to low- and middle-income families, and less for wealthy families. This will deliver up to $533 per child per month tax free, and will give more money to 9 out of 10families, than Harper’s taxed plan. This will lift 315,000 children out of poverty.
  • Invest $125 million per year in the economic security of Canadian families through more flexible parental benefits such as the possibility of longer leave – up to 18 months - combined with maternity benefits – at a lower benefit level.
  • Meet with provinces, territories, and Indigenous communities to begin work on a new National Early Learning and Child Care Framework, to deliver affordable, high-quality, flexible, and fully inclusive child care for Canadian families funded through our investments in the social infrastructure plan. This will be administered in collaboration with, and in respect of, provincial jurisdictions.

View all of Don Trant's responses