2015 Smoking Status Indicator Report

Purpose of the Health Indicator Report

To provide information about smoking status among adults aged 20 and over living in Halton Region.

Background

Smoking tobacco is the leading preventable cause of premature death in Canada.1 Smoking tobacco can lead to many serious health problems, including respiratory and upper digestive tract cancers, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and cardiovascular disease.2 Quitting smoking is the single best thing a smoker can do to improve their health and quality of life.3 Within two days of quitting smoking, their risk of a heart attack will already start to decrease.3 Additionally, 15 years after quitting smoking, the risk of dying from a heart attack is the equivalent to a person who has never smoked.4

This Health Indicator Report uses data from the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Key Findings

  • In 2015, 11% of Halton adults reported being current smokers, 32% reported being former smokers and 58% reported having never smoked.
  • From 2001 to 2015 the percentage of Halton adults who reported being current smokers decreased from 22% to 11% and this decrease was statistically significant.
  • From 2001 to 2015 the percentage of Halton adults who reported having never smoked increased from 49% to 58% and this increase was statistically significant.
  • From 2001 to 2015 there were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of Halton adults who reported being former smokers.

Sex

  • In 2015, there were no statistically significant differences by sex in the percentage of Halton adults who reported being current smokers.

Age

  • In 2015, Halton adults aged 65+ were less likely than all other adults to report being current smokers, these differences were statistically significant when comparing adults aged 65+ to all other age groups.
  • From 2001-2015 the percentage of Halton adults aged 20 and over who reported being current smokers decreased in all age groups and these decreases were all statistically significant. However, the percentage of Halton adults aged 20-44 who reported being current smokers has declined faster than adults aged 45-64 and 65+.

Municipality

  • In 2015, Oakville and Burlington adults were less likely than adults in Halton Hills to report being current smokers, and these differences were statistically significant.
  • Estimates of smoking status and statistical significance have varied over the years between 2001-2015, likely as a result of small sample sizes.

Income

  • In 2015 there were no statistically significant differences by income in the percentage of Halton adults who reported being current smokers.

Education

  • In 2015, Halton adults aged 25 and over who were post-secondary graduates were less likely to report being current smokers compared to adults who were not post-secondary graduates. This difference was statistically significant.

References

  1. Health Canada. 2009. Health Concerns—About Tobacco Control. Retrieved June 2016 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/about-apropos/index-eng.php
  2. Health Canada. 2011. Smoking and Your Body. Accessed June 2016 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/body-corps/index-eng.php
  3. Health Canada. 2015. Quit Smoking. Accessed June 2016 from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/quit-cesser/index-eng.php
  4. The Lung Association. 2016. 15 Years After Quitting. Accessed June 2016 from https://nb.lung.ca/protect-your-lungs/smoking/benefits-quitting/15-years-after-quitting