2013 - 2014 Low Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines Indicator Report

Purpose of the Health Indicator Report

To provide information on the percentage of adults aged 19 and over in Halton Region and Ontario who exceeded the Canadian Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines (LRADG).

Background

In 2011, Canada introduced new LRADG.1 A full description of the Canadian LRADG are available on the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse website.1 The LRADG measured in this report are an adaptation of the actual guidelines based on the data available.

Continuous, long term use of alcohol can lead to chronic conditions such as cirrhosis of the liver, cancer, cardiovascular disease and mental illnesses.1 Binge/heavy drinking causes intoxication which can lead to injuries, car crashes or death.1

This Health Indicator Report uses data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS).

Key Findings

Halton vs. Ontario

  • In 2013/14, 46% of Halton adults reported exceeding the LRADG. More specifically, 4% reported exceeding guideline 1, 21% exceeding guideline 2, and 21% exceeding both guidelines.
  • In 2013/14, 43% of Ontario adults reported exceeding the LRADG. More specifically, 4% reported exceeding guideline 1, 22% exceeding guideline 2, and 17% exceeding both guidelines.
  • In 2013/14, there was no statistically significant difference between Halton and Ontario in the percent of adults who reported exceeding the LRADG.
  • There have been no statistically significant changes in the percentage of adults aged 19 and over in either Halton or Ontario who reported exceeding the LRADG from 2001 to 2014.

Sex

  • In 2013/14, Halton males were more likely than females to report exceeding the LRADG. This difference was statistically significant.

Age

  • In 2013/14, the percentage of Halton adults who reported exceeding the LRADG decreased with age. This difference was statistically significant when comparing adults aged 19-24 and 25-44 to adults aged 45-64 and 65+.

Municipality

  • In 2013/14, adults in Halton Hills were more likely than adults in Burlington, Oakville and Milton to report exceeding the LRADG, however these differences were not statistically significant.

Income

  • In 2013/14, the percentage of Halton adults who reported exceeding the LRADG increased as income increased. This difference was statistically significant when comparing adults in the low and middle income groups to adults in the highest income group.

Education

  • In 2013/14 there was no statistically significant difference by education in the percentage of Halton adults who reported exceeding the LRADG.

References

  1. Drinking Guidelines. 2014. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA). Accessed June 2015