2012 Support for Energy Efficient Housing Indicator Report

Purpose of the Health Indicator Report

To determine public support among Halton adults aged 18 and over for a by-law in Halton where all new houses are built using high energy efficiency standards.

Background

17% of all energy used in Canada is energy consumed at home, which generates 15% of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions.1 Greenhouse gases contribute to climate change.1 Saving energy at home can help decrease the impact humans have on the environment.1 New houses can be built to high energy efficiency standards by including things like energy efficient windows and insulation to reduce the amount of energy used. Energy efficient homes not only help the environment, but can also help to increase savings and improve comfort.1

This Health Indicator Report uses data from the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Key Findings

  • In 2012, 92% of Halton adults reported that they would support a by-law where all new houses in Halton are built to high energy efficiency standards. 75% of adults would still support this by-law if it meant a 5% increase in housing costs.
  • From 2009 to 2012 there were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support a by-law where new homes are built to high energy efficiency standards, or the percentage of adults who would still support this by-law if it meant a 5% increase in housing costs.

Sex

  • In 2012, there were no significant differences by sex in the percentage of Halton residents who reported that they would support a by-law where all new houses in Halton are built to high energy efficiency standards.

Age

  • In 2012, support for a by-law where all new houses in Halton are built to high energy efficiency standards decreased as age increased. These differences were statistically significant when comparing adults aged 25-44 to adults aged 45-64 and adults aged 65+.

Municipality

  • In 2012, there were no significant differences by municipality in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support a by-law where all new houses in Halton are built to high energy efficiency standards.

Income

  • In 2012, there were no significant differences by income in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support a by-law where all new houses in Halton are built to high energy efficiency standards.

Education

  • In 2012, Halton adults aged 25 and over who were post-secondary graduates were more likely than adults who were not post-secondary graduates to report that they would support a by-law where all new houses in Halton are built to high energy efficiency standards, and this difference was statistically significant.

References

  1. Natural Resources Canada. 2015. Energy-Efficient Homes. Accessed June 2015 from https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/efficiency/housing/new-homes/5023