2015 Public Transit Indicator Report

Purpose of the Health Indicator Report

To provide information about public transit use and support for transit services, among adults aged 18 and over living in Halton Region.

Read the complete report

Background

Public transit systems have a big impact on communities and the health of those living within those communities.1 Public transit systems reduce the need for single occupant vehicle trips, reduce vehicle pollutant emissions, and increase incidental physical activity for users.1 Public transit systems also provide necessary transportation for people who cannot access or use personal vehicles because of physical, economic or other limitations.1

Level of transit services vary between Halton communities due to a variety of factors. Local transit services operate in 3 of the 4 Halton municipalities: Burlington, Milton, and Oakville. In addition to local public transit, GO Transit is available in certain areas in Halton.

This Health Indicator Report uses data from the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Key Findings

Public Transit Use

Overall Findings & Trends Over Time

  • In 2015, 11% of Halton adults reported having used public transit in the last month to get to places within their community.
  • There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of Halton adults who reported having used public transit in the last month within their community in 2009 and 2015.
  • There were no statistically significant differences by sex, income and education in the percentage of Halton adults who reported having used public transit in the last month within their community.

Age

  • In 2015, Halton adults aged 18-24 were more likely than all other age groups to report having used public transit in the last month. This difference was statistically significant when comparing ages 18-24 to all other age groups.

Municipality

  • In 2015, Halton adults in Oakville were more likely than adults in Burlington to report having used public transit in the last month, and this difference was statistically significant.

Support for Public Transit Within the Community

Overall Findings & Trends Over Time

  • In 2015, 85% of Halton adults reported that they would support local government spending to improve transit service within their local community. 58% of adults would still support spending if it meant a 2% increase in property taxes.
  • From 2008 to 2015 the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support local government spending to improve transit service within the community increased from 79% to 85% and this increase was statistically significant.
  • From 2008 to 2015 there were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would still support local government spending to improve transit service within the community if it meant a 2% increase in property taxes.
  • There were no statistically significant differences by age, income or education in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support local government spending to improve transit service within their community.

Sex

  • In 2015, Halton females were more likely than males to report that they would support local government spending on transit service within their local community, and this difference was statistically significant.

Municipality

  • In 2015, Halton adults in Halton Hills were less likely than adults in all other municipalities to report that they would support local government spending on transit service within their local community. This difference was statistically significant when comparing Halton Hills to Burlington and Oakville.

Support for Public Transit Between Communities

Overall Findings & Trends Over Time

  • In 2015, 66% of Halton adults reported that they would support local government spending to improve transit service between communities. 49% of adults would still support spending if it meant a 2% increase in property taxes.
  • From 2008 to 2015 there were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support local government spending to improve transit service between communities or who reported still supporting spending if it meant a 2% increase in property taxes.
  • There were no statistically significant differences by education in the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support local government spending to improve transit service between communities.

Sex

  • In 2015, Halton females were more likely than males to report that they would support local government spending on transit service between communities, and this difference was statistically significant.

Age

  • In 2015, the percentage of Halton adults who reported that they would support local government spending on transit service between communities decreased as age increased.
  • These differences were statistically significant when comparing adults aged 45-64 to adults aged 18-24, and adults aged 65+ to adults aged 18-24 and 25-44.

Municipality

  • In 2015, adults in Milton were more likely than adults in all other municipalities to report that they would support spending on transit service between communities. These differences were statistically significant when comparing Milton to all other municipalities.

Income

  • In 2015, adults in the middle income group were more likely than adults in the high income group to report that they would support local government spending on transit service between communities, and this difference was statistically significant.

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. CDC Transportation Recommendations. Accessed May 2016 from https://www.cdc.gov/transportation/recommendation.htm (external link)