2013 - 2014 Heavy Drinking Indicator Report

Purpose of the Health Indicator Report

To provide information on the percentage of residents aged 12 and over who reported heavy drinking in Halton Region and Ontario.

Background

Heavy drinking puts people at a higher risk of developing alcohol-related problems.1 Heavy drinking is associated with an increased risk of death or injuries from motor vehicle collisions, alcohol poisoning, falls, drowning and other hazards from poor judgment and lack of coordination. 2 In the long term, heavy drinking can lead to high blood pressure, stroke, liver disease, and neurological damage.2

In this report heavy drinking is defined as having consumed 5 or more drinks for men, and 4 of more drinks for women on at least one occasion per month in the past 12 months.

This Health Indicator Report uses data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

Key Findings

  • In 2013/14, 19% of Halton residents reported heavy drinking.
  • From 2001 to 2013/14 the percentage of Ontario residents who reported heavy drinking increased from 15% to 17%, and this increase was statistically significant. There were no statistically significant differences for the percentage of Halton residents who reported heavy drinking.

Sex

  • In 2013/14, Halton males were more likely than females to report heavy drinking, and this difference was statistically significant.

Age

  • In 2013/14, 12% of Halton’s underage teenagers aged 16 to 18 reported heavy drinking.
  • In 2013/14 heavy drinking in adults was most common in those aged 19-24 and decreased with age. This difference was statistically significant when comparing residents aged 19-24 and 25-44 to residents aged 16-18, 45-64, and 65+.

Municipality

  • In 2013/14, there were no statistically significant differences by municipality in the percentage of Halton residents who reported heavy drinking.

Income

  • In 2013/14, the percentage of Halton residents who reported heavy drinking increased as income increased. These differences were statistically significant when comparing residents in the low income group to residents in the high income group.

Education

  • In 2013/14, there were no statistically significant differences by education in the percentage of Halton residents who reported heavy drinking.

References

  1. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. 2015. Fact Sheets– Binge Drinking. Accessed May 2016 from http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/binge-drinking.htm (external link)
  2. Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. 2016. Adult Heavy Drinking. Accessed May 2016 from http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/pubhealth/init_report/ahd.html (external link)