2014 Dental Insurance Indicator Report

Purpose of the Health Indicator Report

To provide information on dental insurance coverage, type of coverage (private, employer, or government), as well as refusal of necessary dental treatment due to lack of insurance coverage, for adults aged 18 and over living in Halton Region.

Background

Dental care is an essential service that has the potential to improve oral health and subsequently maintain a good  health-related quality of life.1 Dental insurance is an important indicator of dental care.1

This Health Indicator Report uses data from the Rapid Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Key Findings

Dental Insurance Status

Trends Over Time

  • In 2014, 74% of Halton adults reported having dental insurance while 26% reported not having it. Of the adults who reported having dental insurance, 12% reported having private, 60% reported having employer-paid and 2% reported having government sponsored insurance. There were no statistically significant changes in the percentage of adults reporting they have dental insurance or the types of dental insurance from 2009 to 2014.

Sex

  • In 2014, there were no statistically significant differences by sex in the percentage of Halton adults who reported having dental insurance.

Age

  • In 2014, Halton adults aged 65+ were less likely than all other age groups to report having dental insurance. This difference was statistically significant.

Municipality

  • In 2014, there were no statistically significant differences by municipality in the percentage of Halton adults who reported having dental insurance.

Income

  • In 2014, the percentage of Halton adults who reported having dental insurance was higher in both the middle and high income groups compared to the low income group. This difference was statistically significant.

Education

  • In 2014, Halton adults aged 25 and over who were post-secondary graduates were more likely to report having dental insurance compared to adults who were not post-secondary graduates. This difference was statistically significant.

Refusal of Necessary Treatment

  • In 2014, 8% of Halton adults reported refusing necessary dental treatment. There were no statistically significant changes in the percentage of Halton adults who reported refusing necessary dental treatment from 2009 to 2014.

Reasons for Refusing Treatment

  • In 2014, Halton adults reported the following reasons for refusing necessary dental treatment:
    • 2% because insurance would not cover any of the cost
    • 2% because insurance would only cover part of the cost
    • 1% because they did not have dental insurance
    • 4% reported other responses. Other responses included but were not limited to; did not think treatment was necessary, treatment was too expensive and a fear of the dentist.
  • There were no statistically significant changes in the reason dental treatment was refused from 2009 to 2014. 

References

  1. Bhatti, T., Rana, Z., & Grootendorst, P. (2007). Dental Insurance, Income and the Use of Dental Care in Canada. Canadian Dental Association - Professional Issues, 73(1), 57-65. Retrieved May 25, 2015, from www.cda-adc.ca/jcda/vol-73/issue-1/57.html (external link)