2012 Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Indicator Report

Knowledge and beliefs about the health effects of drinking alcohol during pregnancy among Halton adults aged 18 and over.  Comparisons by sex and age group (RRFSS).

Key Findings

  • In 2012, 71% (±3) of Halton adults aged 18 and over responded that alcohol use during pregnancy could be harmful to an unborn baby, 16% (±2) responded it was not harmful, and 14% (±2) responded that it depends. Differences were statistically significant when compared to 2007.
  • In 2012, the percent of Halton adults aged 18 and over who responded that alcohol use during pregnancy was harmful to an unborn baby was not significantly different between males [70% (±4)] and females [71% (±3)].
  • In 2012, the percent of Halton adults aged 18 and over who believed that alcohol use during pregnancy was harmful to an unborn baby did not differ significantly by age group.
  • In 2012, 58% (±3) of Halton adults aged 18 and over believed that alcohol use at any time throughout pregnancy was harmful, 21% (±2) thought it was only harmful during the beginning of pregnancy, 4%*(±1) believed it was harmful during the middle or end, and 17% (±2) believed it was not harmful during pregnancy.
  • In 2012, when Halton adults aged 18 and over were asked about the potential health problems alcohol causes, 60% (±3) believed that it could cause permanent birth defects or deformities, 60% (±3) believed it could cause permanent brain damage, 54% (±3) believed the baby could be born with alcohol in its system, and 16% (±2) believed it would have no adverse health effects.

Sex

  • In 2012, the percent of Halton adults aged 18 and over who responded that alcohol use during pregnancy was harmful to an unborn baby was not significantly different between males 70% (±4) and females 71% (±3). Differences were statistically significant when compared to 2007 (data not shown).

Age Group

  • In 2012, the percent of Halton adults aged 18 and over who believed that alcohol use during pregnancy was harmful to an unborn baby did not differ significantly by age group.
  • The percent of Halton adults aged 25-44 who believe that alcohol use during pregnancy is harmful to the unborn baby decreased significantly from 85% (±5) in 2007 to 71% (±5) in 2012.
  • The percent of Halton adults aged 45-64 who believe that alcohol use during pregnancy is harmful to the unborn baby decreased significantly from 79% (±6) in 2007 to 68% (±4) in 2012.
  • Although the percent of adults aged 18-24 who believed that alcohol use during pregnancy was harmful was higher than the other age groups, the difference was not statistically significant.

Municipality

  • In 2012, the percent of Halton adults aged 18 and over who believed that alcohol use during pregnancy was harmful to an unborn baby did not differ significantly by municipality. Differences were statistically significant when compared to 2007 for Burlington, Oakville and Halton Hills.